crossrail.jpg

The line that ate London

Crossrail, the Elizabeth line, or ‘Lizzie line’, is a new railway for London which will run from Reading in the west to Essex in the east. It is currently the largest infrastructure project in Europe [or at least until the 31st October]. The tunneling machines [a bit like Phyllis who is depicted in this drawing] have been inching their way beneath our feet for the best part of the last decade. Unfortunately, “to allow for extensive testing”, it missed it’s grand opening date of December 2018, and is now unlikely to be complete before this year is out. 

Tottenham Court Road, as the focus of this drawing, is particularly interesting in the complexity of its’ tunneling, becoming an interchange with the central and northern lines, but also in its position beneath the iconic Centre Point tower. The station happens to be opposite the Dominion Theatre, site of the London Beer Flood in 1814 at the Meux brewery. The colourful fly at the top of the drawing is a nod to the beautiful Eduardo Paolozzi mosaics at the old station, some which were removed during construction (although it should be said that 95% have been retained). 

It is to be seen how this new transport behemoth will transform the lives of Londoners and tourists alike. 

The Line that Ate London

The Line that Ate London

prints available on request

Crossrail, the Elizabeth line, or ‘Lizzie line’, is a new railway for London which will run from Reading in the west to Essex in the east. It is currently the largest infrastructure project in Europe [or at least until the 31st October]. The tunneling machines [a bit like Phyllis who is depicted in this drawing] have been inching their way beneath our feet for the best part of the last decade. Unfortunately, “to allow for extensive testing”, it missed it’s grand opening date of December 2018, and is now unlikely to be complete before 2021.

Tottenham Court Road, as the focus of this drawing, is particularly interesting in the complexity of its’ tunneling, becoming an interchange with the central and northern lines, but also in its position beneath the iconic Centre Point tower. The station happens to be opposite the Dominion Theatre, site of the London Beer Flood in 1814 at the Meux brewery. The colourful fly at the top of the drawing is a nod to the beautiful Eduardo Paolozzi mosaics at the old station, some which were removed during construction (although it should be said that 95% have been retained).

It is to be seen how this new transport behemoth will transform the lives of Londoners and tourists alike.

[2019]